Category Archives: Nutrition

The Unhealthy Side of Gluten-free

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More and more people are going gluten-free these days to lose weight that don’t have Celiac disease or any form of gluten-intolerance. Yes, eating gluten-free can help you shed pounds, but so can reducing caloric intake, increasing physical activity and adding more fruits and vegetables to your diet. A gluten-free diet can be unsuccessful if you rely too heavily on processed foods or substitute foods like cookies, breads, cakes and pastas. Most gluten-free items are higher in fat, calories and carbs than their gluten-containing friends.

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Glutino Sandwich Cookies. These are delicious and safe for those with Celiac because they are made in a dedicated gluten-free facility. However if you are not gluten-intolerant there may be reason to stick with the original- The Oreo. Glutino Sandwich Cookies are worse for you than their counterpart. Here is the nutrition breakdown:

Portion: 3 cookies
Calories: 190
Total Fat: 9g 14%
Carbohydrates: 27g 9%
Protein: 0g

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Who would have ever thought that Nabisco’s Oreo Cookie could ever be considered better for you than anything ūüôā Here is the Oreo nutrition breakdown:
Serving Size: 3 cookies
Calories: 160
Fat: 7g
Carbs: 24g
Protein: 1g

Oreo has 30 less calories than the Glutino Sandwich cookie, 2g less fat, 3 grams less carbohydrate and even has protein in it. It is not a huge difference, but if you are counting calories and think just because something is gluten-free it is better for you this may be an inaccurate perception.

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Bread is another sneaky culprit. Gluten-containing Arnold Brand 100% Whole Wheat Bread has the following nutritional breakdown:
Serving Size: 1 slice
Calories: 110
Fat: 1g
Carbs: 20g
Protein: 5g

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Udi’s brand bread (found in the freezer section) has the following nutritional content:
Service size 2 slices
Calories per slice: 110 calories
Fat per slice: 3g
Carbs per slice: 18g
Protein per slice: 2.5g

While the nutritional value doesn’t seem to be that different one other factor needs to be taken into consideration- size of the slice. Arnold’s slices are close to double the size of an Udi’s slice.

While not all gluten-free foods are worse than gluten-containing foods it is important to read labels and know what you are eating whether you are gluten-free to lose weight or you have Celiac disease, gluten-intolerance or gluten-sensitivities.

What other gluten-free foods have you found that are worse for you than gluten-containing foods?

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Maintaining a Gluten-Free Home

My boyfriend and I recently moved into a house at the beach. ¬†We had a discussion about how we would handle food in our house. ¬†I have Celiac disease and am dairy free, gluten-free and shellfish-free. ¬†He likes pizza, hamburgers, hot dogs in addition to pretty much anything I cook. ¬†I wasn’t completely stressed about the conversation, however in my mind I was thinking: how would we wash the dishes together? ¬†Would we have to separate out items in the dish washer, would we have separate dish sponges, or would we have to use separate utensils or plates? ¬†Then the thought of friends coming over began to really stress me out. ¬†Having to be strict and educate friends on what to use and what not to touch did not sound fun for me or for them.

We decided to maintain a 100% gluten-free household. My boyfriend was fine with getting his pizza, hot dog or hamburger fix for lunch, when we go out to eat or when we eat separately. ¬†That was music to my ears. The expense of cooking gluten-free for an entire household can be quite costly. However, it is worth it to feel safe in my own home and cooking at home still costs less (most of the time) than dining out. ¬†It really isn’t that hard to make gluten-free meals at home that taste yummy. Most people don’t even realize what I make is gluten-free. ¬†I enjoy finding new recipes and using fresh ingredients. ¬†Cooking is fun for me. And being healthy is important. So far I have had no complaints…

How do you maintain a safe kitchen? Is your kitchen 100% gluten-free? Do you take steps to keep gluten-containing foods and utensils separate from the gluten-free foods and utensils?

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Complaints About a Gluten-Free Diner

I have to share this story with you.  A close friend of mine is a server at a local fine dining establishment.  Recently she waited on a woman who said she had a gluten-allergy.  My friend, who is very educated on gluten-free ingredients, worked with the woman making sure there was no cross contamination, sauces were left off that had gluten, dressings were substituted, spices were gluten-free, etc.  She went way out of her way to make her meal as safe as possible. The entire meal was gluten-free, until dessert, when the woman ordered ice cream with cookies and ate the cookies knowing full well they were not gluten-free.

What are your thoughts on this?

My friend was happy to¬†accommodate¬†her needs, but was confused that she spent so much time going over the menu and took extra steps to make sure this woman’s meal was safe, only to watch her eat cookies at the end of the meal.

Personally, I think this hurts people who really are living their entire lives gluten-free and may cause restaurants not to take gluten-allergies seriously during food prep for others who truly are gluten-free.

What do you think?

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Nutrition: Mila

A few weeks ago one of our followers commented on my post about a new nutritional supplement called Mila. ¬†She was¬†adamant¬†about it’s benefits to those of us with gluten-issues. She asked me if I was willing to give it a try and I thought, why not. ¬†I had heard a little about its benefits but was excited to learn more. ¬†I had a hunch this is something Dr. Oz had reported on and sure enough I found a link to a blog post by one of his staff members.

Mila is ground Chia seed. ¬†Chia is known as “a super food” and each serving contains a ton of Omega -3s and 5 grams of fiber per serving. According to the blog post on DoctorOz.com¬†“The nutritional benefits of chia include fiber, omega fatty acids, calcium, antioxidants and much more ‚Äď even protein!”

The suggested uses of Mila include:

  • blending with yogurt, oatmeal, hummus, cottage cheese
  • Stir into milk
  • mix into pancakes, muffin, bread or cake mix
  • Toss into a salad or pasta
  • Mix into pizza sauce, pasta sauce, rice, quinoa or other grains
  • Blend into smoothies
I decided to try blending it into my morning smoothie a few times a week (it was suggested to have Mila earlier in the day and drink a lot of water afterwards).

Here is my favorite smoothie:

  • frozen Strawberries
  • frozen chopped bananas
  • a handful of greens (spinach and kale are my favorite)
  • one spoonful of almond butter
  • a few dashes of agave nectar
  • almond milk about 1-2 cups
I mixed 1 tablespoon of mila with 9 tablespoons of water and let it soak in the blender about 15 minutes before I wanted to make my smoothie. Warning, Mila is not very tasty by itself, you need to add it to something with flavor.
According to Seed4change.net Mila is very absorbent when pre-soaked in water. ¬† Pre-soaking Mila enhances the bio-availability of Mila’s nutrients (including fiber), it hydrates and decreases removal of water from the the lower intestine. ¬†Pre-soaking may also help eliminate bloating and stomach discomfort that some may experience (um, probably everyone reading this blog experiences this).
Here is my yummy smoothie!  I know it looks a little weird because of the greens, but I promise it is delicious and nutritious!

After a few smoothies a week I definitely noticed a difference.  I had more energy and the stomach pain and discomfort I usually felt went away.  I am not sure about how much this costs or all of the places you can purchase this, but you can try contacting Jessica at Lifemax.  I would think that you can find it at Whole Foods and Native Sun as well.

Have you tried Mila? What are your thoughts?

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